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SW Monsoon active over Nagaland

Pune, Aug 2 (UNI) The Southwest Monsoon has been active over Nagaland, Manipur, Mizoram,Tripura, west Uttar Pradesh, east Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh, said the Indian Meteorological Department here today.

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ICICI Lombard launches insurance service on Telegram messenger

Mumbai, Aug 2 (UNI) Tired of the lengthy procedure of seeking answers to your queries relating to insurance products? Then hook on to AI-powered chatbot introduced by ICICI Lombard that provides self-service facilities on Telegram messenger.

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Who killed Edai? Chicago drill rapper reportedly shot 6 times in the chest and stomach

The incident reportedly occurred at the intersection of 72nd Street and South Bennett Avenue in Chicago

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Border Row: Mizoram Drops Police Case Against All Accused Assam Officials

Zoramthanga said the decision was taken in order to "build a conducive atmosphere for amicable solution" to the row.

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After Fighting COVID, Women's Hockey Team Gives India a Memorable Olympic Moment

The Indian women's hockey team pulled off a remarkable result as they beat Australia at the Tokyo Olympics in QF.

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Kamalpreet Kaur Finishes Sixth in Discus Final at Tokyo Olympics

Kamalpreet Kaur's best throw was her second one which travelled 63.70m in the discuss final at the Tokyo Olympics.

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Keep Emotions Aside, Says Coach; India vs Belgium in SF at 7am IST on Tuesday

India will play their first SF in the men's Olympic hockey competition since 1972 when they face Belgium.

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Veteran Film Critic Rashid Irani Passes Away Aged 74

Khalid Mohamed, Aniruddha Guha, Renuka Joshi, and others expressed condolences on Rashid Irani's demise.

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GATE 2022 Exam Dates Announced: Registration to Begin from 30 August

GATE 2022 exams will be conducted on 5, 6, 12, and 13 February 2022.

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India in England: Mayank Agarwal Suffers Concussion, Out of First Test

India's problems with openers continue in England after Mayank Agarwal picked up an injury.

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Afghan fighting rages as US and UK accuse Taliban of massacring civilians

Afghan forces battled to stop a first major city from falling to the Taliban Monday as the United States and

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Sifan Hassan dominates to win 5,000m at Tokyo Olympics in bid to claim historic gold medal treble

One down, two to go. With a tactical run that finished with a mad dash, Sifan Hassan has completed the first part of her golden hat-trick. A confident 5,000m race completed in 14 minutes 36.79 seconds has given her a first Olympic title. And as remarkable as it was, her celebrations were short and sweet. Tilts at the 1,500 and 10,000 await, and given how blissful she seemed to make this, her second race in 12 hours after beginning the day with a heat win in the former, despite taking a tumble, the three-for might be on. For now, the Netherlands have their first athletics medal since 1992. “I can’t believe it. I used all my energy this morning and I was kind of tired. I couldn’t believe what happened. It was terrible when I tripped,” Hassan said. “I felt terrible afterwards and I never thought I am going to be Olympic champion. “It has been an amazing day. When I fell down and had to jump up I felt like I was using so much energy. I couldn’t believe the feelings in my legs. All the energy seemed to leave me. “Before the race here I didn’t even care. I was so tired. Without coffee I would never be Olympic champion. I needed all the caffeine. I was so scared I wasn’t going to do it.” Eyebrows were raised on Monday when Hassan confirmed she was going all on the trio of titles in her sights. She managed to win gold in both the 1500 and 10,000 at the World Championships in Doha, the first to do so in those events. But this was an altogether different challenge. Hassan’s first final was played out in taxing conditions - Monday’s night session began in 28-degree-centigrade heat and 80 percent humidity - and with it she may have wondered if she knew what she was getting into. Yes, actually, she did. “For me it’s crucial to follow my heart,” said Hassan. The medals, she says, were not the real concern, but the challenge to excel at all three to keep her motivated and “enjoying this beautiful sport”. Any doubts over her motivation were blown out of the water on Monday morning when the 28-year-old crashed to the ground with the best part of 400 of her 1500m heat to go. Somehow, she managed to get to her feet, make up the 50m gap to catch everyone up and win by 0.11 seconds. A statement, no doubt. But the extra exertion for that emergency sprint at the hottest part of the day was not in the script. And as she began this 5,000m final, boosted by the rainstorm that lowered temperatures, the question was whether she had enough in the tank to burn for her usual late bursts. Her tactics were no different to usual: coasting at the back, a couple of strides back in fact, perhaps to avoid a repeat of this morning’s fall. As the race progressed, she began her slow move into the pack. With three laps to go, the usual breaks occurred, splitting the race into three distinct sections. The front cluster consisted of two Kenyans (Hellen Obiri and Agnes Jebet Tirop), a trio of Ethiopians (Gudaf Tsegay, Ejgayehu Taye and Senbere Teferi) and one ambitious Dutch woman. She entered the last 400m in fourth and, with the bell still ringing in her ears, kicked up a gear. Obiri, though, wasn’t having it, replicating the shift and putting the fear of god in Hassan. Somehow, another gear was found, and a sizeable lead opened up into the penultimate bend. Hassan had a few looks over her shoulder into the home straight, arching her neck with the bend to see how much or little she needed to finish the job. As she switched to looking ahead, she went all out. A remarkable final lap was completed in 57.36. Obiri, fighting to the last, had to “settle” for silver - a repeat of her placing in Rio 2016. Tsegay, 24, won the race for bronze. Tuesday is a day off in that she won’t be racing. But the recovery and fine-tuning ahead of Wednesday’s 1500 semi-final will keep her busy. That will be the toughest of the medals to bag given the challenges, which includes Great Britain’s Laura Muir. It was Muir who in 2019 said there was “a cloud” over Hassan’s accomplishments in Doha. The intimation being her links with the shamed coach Alberto Salazar. Earlier that week, Salazar had been given a four-year ban by the US Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) for doping violations. He had mentored Hassan since 2016. Hassan has rallied against the accusations, pleading innocence, telling anyone who would listen that she has been clean all her life. And it is hard not to see the challenge she has set herself and wonder how much of it is fuelled by hate, not just her “heart”. Those in the long-distance community still have not warmed to her because of those Salazar links. In turn, she has made little effort to change their minds. Come to think of it, maybe this is her revenge? That after two years of sneers, she has decided to take as many of the things her peers covet most - Olympic gold medals - away from them. One middle, two long - thus sticking it to a huge chunk of the distance running community. The irony is that by excelling like this, the cloud only gets darker and the rumours only get louder. And Hassan will probably care even less. Read More Olympics skateboarding schedule: When will Sky Brown perform? Tokyo Olympics LIVE: GB cycling after Puerto Rico win hurdles gold Laurel Hubbard: New Zealand transgender weightlifter in profile

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Barack Obama 60th birthday bash: From barbeque to pies, lavish spread expected for star guests

Going by past parties, guests are going ot be treated with an elaborate gastronomical affair as the former POTUS turns 60

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Big feelings are normal. How to help tweens and teens handle them

Teaching kids about feelings is a key part of adolescence, and helping adolescents learn emotional self-regulation and navigating relationships is key to learn going into adulthood.

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Simon Calder’s ‘Ask me Anything’: The Independent’s travel expert answers questions ahead of green list update

From this week, residents of the US and the EU (sans France) are able to travel to Britain without quarantine if they’re fully jabbed. The move paves the way for families and friends to reunite without the threat of quarantine, though it has come much too late to rescue the summer for the UK’s currently non-existent inbound tourism industry. The decision to allow overseas visitors – and UK expatriates vaccinated abroad – to avoid self-isolation on entry from amber list countries came into effect at 4am on 2 August. The rule change comes ahead of the next update to the green, amber and red lists this week, expected on Thursday 5 August; and questions remain over the status of France (currently on the bespoke “amber plus” list) and ongoing concerns over infections in Spain. The foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, has confirmed that mandatory quarantine was kept in place for arrivals from France was “based on the prevalence of the so-called Beta variant, in particular in the Réunion bit of France”. Many people are struggling to understand why Réunion itself remains on the plain amber list. Ahead of the review to the travel traffic light lists, at 12 noon on Tuesday, 3 August I’ll be on hand to answer your travel questions about the latest rule changes. Register to submit your question in the Comments below. If you’re not already a member, click “sign up” in the Comments box to leave your question. Don’t worry if you can’t see your question – they will be hidden until I join the conversation to answer them. Then join us live on this page at 12pm on Tuesday as I tackle as many questions as I can within an hour. Read More What is the 31 July checkpoint and what changes could be announced? Which countries could be added to the green list? Where can I travel and go on holiday now?

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Beyoncé's 'Formation' named best music video of all time by Rolling Stone

Beyoncé's "Formation" has been named best music video of all time by Rolling Stone.

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Lily Allen discusses estrangement from actor father Keith

Lily Allen has discussed being estranged from her actor father Keith, saying they “haven’t connected for a while”. The singer is set to appear on stage this month in 2:22: A Ghost Story at London’s Noël Coward theatre. Talking about her parents’ reaction to her theatre debut, Allen told The Telegraph that her mother, the producer Alison Owen, has been supportive, but she has not heard from her father, The Pembrokeshire Murders star Keith. She said: “I haven’t really spoken to him, to be honest, for a while. The last time I texted him was on Father’s Day and he texted back saying ‘Thank you’. We haven’t connected for a while.” Allen has spoken about her and her father’s strained relationship before, and in 2018 she revealed that they fell out over something she wrote in her memoir that year. In her book, My Thoughts Exactly, Allen claimed that Keith had had a cocaine-related heart attack at Glastonbury Festival in 1998 when she was 14. She said this admission made her father “quite cross” and he claimed it was actually due to acute food poisoning. Several years before that, in 2015, Allen tweeted: “My dad walked out on me when I was 4, I’m sick of this. My dad was at Latitude when I headlined and didn’t even come to see me. I’ve probably spent more time walking my dogs than I have with my dad my entire life.” The Telegraph interview at the weekend also saw Allen talking about her mental health. She told the publication: “I was living life in a bubble for a long time, which was about me, me, me. [But now] I think I’m ready to open myself up to feeling things, which I haven’t been in the past. “I’ve spent the past 15 to 20 years self-medicating and being quite numb about feelings… I feel I’m capable of behaving like a connected adult in a way I haven’t for a long time.” 2:22 is on at the Noel Coward Theatre, London, from 3 August. Read More Snoop Dogg records hilarious commentary for the Olympic equestrian event Fans are thrilled as The Weeknd teases new music, says the next phase ‘starts tonight’ Kris Wu: Chinese pop star detained in Beijing over rape allegations

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China Covid: Concerns grow as Delta outbreak spreads

Authorities are carrying out mass testing and have imposed sweeping lockdowns across 15 provinces.

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Sweden beat Australia to reach Olympics final

Sweden beat Australia 1-0 to set up a gold medal match against Canada at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

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'Digital economy increasingly overcomes COVID-19 disruptions'

Dhaka, Aug. 2 -- Participants at a webinar, titled 'Accelerate Digital Economy for Inclusive Integration in the Asia Pacific - Connecting Digital Industries in Pandemic' have said that the digital economy is increasingly perceived as the way to overcome disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Representatives and thought leaders from governmental, industrial and academic sectors across the Asia Pacific joined the virtual conversation, organised by Huawei, to explore the multiple facets of the digital economy, from a market, technology, inclusiveness and sustainability perspective. They called for leveraging digital opportunities to build an inclusive ecosystem and promoting regional integration that is particularly important while still combating the pandemic, according to a press statement. Ambassador of Indonesia to China Djauhari Oratmangun pointed out in his keynote speech that a new digital economy is shaping the region. "The digital transformation has been significantly accelerated during the pandemic, speeding up business changes," he said. Based on digital knowledge and infrastructure, the digital economy has powered a growing proportion of regional GDP and boosted resilience amid the pandemic. ASEAN predicts the digital economy will contribute 1 trillion US dollars to regional GDP by year. "The development of digital economy ecosystem is a process that involves active participation of multiple stakeholders including those from the private sectors. We welcome the initiative of Huawei to organise this dialogue to practically advocate the process," said Dr Le Quang Lan, Assistant Director for ICT and Tourism Division, ASEAN Secretariat. Dr Tan Khee Giap, Chairman of the Singapore National Committee for Pacific Economic Cooperation (SINCPEC), stressed the importance of the social considerations of digitalising the economy during the panel discussion. "Digitalisation is not just about technological progress, but quality empowerment of digitalization to the public at large is paramount if inclusive integration is to be achieved. The role of the government is providing digital capability as a public good, it can be complemented by private sector ICT companies such as Huawei with quality connectivity," Tan Khee Giap said. Dr Alvin P. Ang from Ateneo de Manila University agreed with the openly accessible approach to the upskilling public with digital knowledge. "The education system must put in context the foundational elements of digitalisation. Whether it's in the basic education level or in the middle-ages or those who are working already, trying to learn and upgrade themselves. We have to invest in them and allow our rural areas to catch up by at least providing them with the basic skills to get through the technology highway," he said. Conveying the business perspective, Professor Jose Decolongon, COO and Managing Director of Corporate Foresight of Embiggen Consulting Philippines, said that micro, small, medium enterprises need to have an understanding of digitalisation to perceive the opportunities when it comes to exploring the digital side of the business. "Challenges are faced by these enterprises but also the large organizations. It's related to the coverage and speed of digital infrastructure. This is where telecom players such as Huawei and our local players can play an important role," Jose Decolongon said. For any query with respect to this article or any other content requirement, please contact Editor at contentservices@htlive.comThe Financial Express

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Stocks Rise Amid Earnings Optimism; Dollar Dips: Markets Wrap

(Bloomberg) -- U.S. equities gained along with stocks in Europe and Asia as upbeat earnings and a surge in corporate

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European Stocks Reach Fresh Record as Earnings Boost Sentiment

(Bloomberg) -- European equities started August with a bang, set for a fresh record close on earnings updates and easing

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Tokyo Olympics: After morning fall Sifan Hassan kicks towards history with 5000m gold

Well, they can’t say they weren’t warned. Roughly 12 hours ago, while many of her rivals were no doubt still tucked up in their cardboard beds, watching on from the Olympic village, Sifan Hassan was lying flat on the track of this stadium, surely for a moment fearing her dream of an unprecedented 1500m, 5,000m and 10,000m treble was about to fall at the first hurdle. Tripped from behind while attempting to cruise through a heat in the shortest of the events, she’d had to scramble to her feet and unleash a devilish kick from 350m out to not only catch the leaders but take the win. Tonight, from an almost identical position on the track - though this time from a standing start - the Dutch athlete kicked again, ripping through one of the strongest fields in Olympic 5,000m history and away from them, a 57second last lap securing gold. One down, two to go. Even before her exertions this morning, a burn-up of this ilk would clearly have been to the liking of the mile world record holder. It was all the more baffling then, when the likes of Hellen Obiri, the two-time world champion looking to finally add the Olympic title to worlds golds over cross country, indoors and out, and Gudaf Tsegay, the fastest in the world this year, allowed this to turn into a crawl. So slow did they set out that the host nation’s Riraka Hironaka found herself at the front, slotting almost by default into the perennial role of the Japanese athlete in these distance finals, making the running when no one else will. With a kilometre to go they were barely inside 15-minute pace, even in this heat pedestrian stuff for a lineup that included five of the ten fastest women in history, a club which, it is worth remembering, Hassan is still not a part, though it is surely a matter of time for an athlete who briefly held the world record over 10,000m earlier this year. The 28-year-old’s mark stood for two days before Letesenbet Gidey bettered it and the Ethiopian lies, fresh, in wait in next weekend’s final over the longer distance. Before then, Hassan faces maybe her toughest task in what she still considers her event, trying to topple defending champion Faith Kipyegon in the 1500m, having watched the Kenyan run away in Monaco when they met in the Diamond League last month. If she can manage that in Friday’s final, the dream will be well and truly alive. Just as Hassan condemned the east African powerhouses of Kenya and Ethiopia to the minor medals, Obiri taking silver and Tsegay the bronze, a Moroccan, Soufiane El Bakkali, ended the former’s 37-year dominance of the men’s 3000m steeplechase, becoming the first non-Kenyan since Poland’s BronisÅ‚aw Malinowski at Moscow 1980 - a Games the African country did not even compete at - to take gold in the event. Ethiopia’s Lamecha Girma was rewarded for his front-running with silver, though a stumble from teammate Getnet Wale on the home bend allowed Benjamin Kigen to run away into bronze and ensure there was at least a Kenyan on the podium. When it comes to being knocked down and getting back up again, they don’t come much more experienced than Kirani James. The 2012 Olympic champion has been battling to keep his career on track since being diagnosed with Grave’s Disease in 2017 but after several disrupted or completely wiped out seasons looks in great form here and, having qualified fastest for the men’s 400m final with a 43.88 - his quickest run since the final in Rio five years ago - a fairytale ending could well be on the cards. The Grenadian made his global breakthrough a decade ago when winning the 400m world title in Daegu as an 18-year-old and were it not for World Athletics’ rules governing athletes with Differences of Sexual Development, Christine Mboma would be attempting a similar feat at the same age here. Instead, the Namibian, second-fastest in the world this year over 400m, has been forced to compete in her second-choice event, the 200m, and she is making quite the impression, having broken the world U20 record twice in a day to qualify second-fastest for tomorrow’s final, where Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson-Herah looks favourite to complete a second successive Olympic sprint double after equaling her personal best of 21.66 in the semi-finals. Elsewhere, one of the clashes of the Games remains on the cards as Sydney McLaughlin, Dalilah Muhammad and Femke Bol, three of the four fastest women in 400m hurdles history, all qualified for Wednesday morning’s final in impressive fashion despite a torrential downpour which forced both the women’s pole vault qualifying and women’s discus final - eventually won by America’s Valarie Allman - to be halted for the best part of an hour. Read More Tokyo Olympics 2021 LIVE! Day 10 updates Laurel Hubbard OUT; Team GB latest Tokyo Olympics: Team GB win eventing team gold for first time in 49 years Emily Campbell wins first women’s Olympic weightlifting medal for Team GB Miltiadis Tentoglou claims Olympic long jump gold for Greece as Jasmine Camacho-Quinn wins 100m hurdles

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Vietnam to receive 50 mln Pfizer vaccine doses in fourth quarter

Around 50 million Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine doses would arrive in Vietnam in the fourth quarter, the health minister says.

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Hassan launches treble bid with gold, Puerto Rico win first

Dutch runner Sifan Hassan stayed on course for a historic Olympic treble with a brilliant victory in the 5,000m on

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